Duke Digest — April 14, 2015

In today’s issue:

  • Duke to Participate in Hill Briefing on USAID Development Partnership
  • Duke Prof Says Legislation Would Hinder, Not Help, a Good Iran Deal
  • How to Congratulate @Duke_MBB: Federal Official Edition
  • Duke Profs Show Basic Research Fades from American Companies
  • Romney Talks Foreign Policy, 2016 in Appearance at Duke
  • Fmr. Rep. Bob Inglis (R-SC, T ’81) to Receive JFK Profile in Courage Award
  • Dukies on the Move

DUKE TO PARTICIPATE IN HILL BRIEFING ON USAID DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP
Representatives from the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD) will be in DC tomorrow for a series of meetings at USAID and the White House as well as a briefing related to the Higher Education Solutions Network (HESN), a flagship program of the USAID Global Development Lab. The briefing, titled ‘Novel Approaches to International Development’ will take place in the Longworth House Office Building Room 1416 from 1:30-2:30PM.

The HESN is a partnership between university innovators and development practitioners, and the briefing will showcase some of the innovative, results-oriented ways this partnership is addressing international development challenges in 66 countries around the world.

To RSVP or request further information, email mitdcnews@mit.edu.

DUKE PROF SAYS LEGISLATION WOULD HINDER, NOT HELP A GOOD IRAN DEAL
Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy and political science, writes in a guest column on TheHill.com, “the Iran Nuclear Agreement Act of 2015, the bill whose principal co-sponsors are Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and former ranking minority member Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.)….weaves a procedural spider web for congressional review and includes a poison pill provision that hinders, rather than helps, getting a good deal.

Congress doesn’t need Corker-Menendez to have a significant say on an Iran deal. The Obama administration would do well to more closely and regularly consult with congressional leaders, privately but genuinely — not just briefing or lobbying — just as other presidents have done on other major arms control issues.”

Read more:
Corker-Menendez bill hinders, not helps, a good Iran deal (theHill.com)

HOW TO CONGRATULATE @DUKE_MBB: FEDERAL OFFICIAL EDITION
As the waning seconds ticked off the clock in last week’s NCAA Men’s Basketball National Championship game, we — like any tech-savvy Duke fans — took to Twitter to watch the praise (and a little criticism) pour in from around the globe.  Former players, celebrities, ecstatic alumni, and – yes – even federal officials chimed in with commentary on the night’s game. ICYMI, don’t worry, here’s a cheat sheet of how lawmakers said congratulations to the Duke University men’s basketball team — the 2015 NCAA Men’s Basketball National Champions.

Read More:
How to Congratulate @Duke_MBB: Federal Official Edition (governmentrelations.duke.edu)

DUKE PROFS SHOW BASIC RESEARCH FADES FROM AMERICAN COMPANIES
In a working paper recently released by the National Bureau of Economic Research, Duke University Fuqua School of Business professors Sharon Belenzon and Ashish Arora argue that American corporations have cut back on the basic scientific research that helped fuel the technology boom of the last 50 years. While spending more on research overall, companies are focusing more on the applied research that makes money and investing less in the basic science that makes those applications possible.

“The thing about basic research that is so, so valuable is that you are creating something that is a public good, something anyone can use,” Belenzon said. “This is why it spurs innovation and creates growth and technical change in the whole economy. But from an individual company’s standpoint, it also means you are making the investment and somebody else is reaping the benefit.”

Read more:
Basic Scientific Research Fades from American Corporations (fuqua.duke.edu)

ROMNEY TALKS FOREIGN POLICY, 2016 IN APPEARANCE AT DUKE
Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts governor, spoke to a full crowd at the Fuqua School of Business on Tuesday, April 8. The discussion—A Conversation with Governor Mitt Romney—was hosted by Peter Feaver, professor of political science and public policy and director of Duke’s American Grand Strategy Program, and focused on the upcoming 2016 election cycle and foreign policy. Romney gave his thoughts on growing global security threats—focusing on his disagreement with the preliminary deal involving Iran’s nuclear power reached last week.

Read More:
Romney talks 2016, foreign policy to sold-out crowd at Fuqua (dukechronicle.com)

FMR. REP. BOB INGLIS (R-SC, T ’81) TO RECIEVE JFK PROFILE IN COURAGE AWARD
On Monday, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation announced that Former U.S. Congressman Bob Inglis would recieve the 2015 John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award™. According to the organization’s website, Inglis receives the award “for the political courage he demonstrated when he reversed his previous position on climate change, knowing that by acknowledging the scientific reality of atmospheric warming and calling on the United States to meaningfully address the issue, he was jeopardizing his political career.” The award will be presented in a May 3 ceremony.

Read More:
JFK Profile in Courage Award (profileincourageaward.org)

DUKIES ON THE MOVE
William K. Davis (T ’84, G ’87) began his new role yesterday as executive director of the United States Global Leadership Coalition.  Davis heads to USGLC from the United Nations Development Program, where he was director of the Washington office.

Read More:
Top Global Affairs Leader William Davis Appointed USGLC Executive Director (usglc.org)