Duke Digest – April 22, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • Dr. Bill Chameides to Testify before Subcommittee on Environment April 25
  • Opinion: Sanford Professor on Immigration Policy
  • Opinion: Mostly Quiet on the Western Front
  • Shooting Thrusts Sanford Experts into Gun Policy Debate
  • Faculty Experts: What Makes for an Ethical Policy Response to a Crisis?
  • Former Ambassador Donna J. Hrinak to Deliver Biddle Lecture at Duke
  • Sen. Mo Cowan (T ’91) Honors Legacy of First Black Students
  • Former Gov. Bev Perdue to Join Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Duke Names Five Professors Bass Teaching Fellows

 

DR. BILL CHAMEIDES TO TESTIFY BEFORE SUBCOMMITEE ON ENVIRONMENT APRIL 25
Dr. Bill Chameides, Dean of the Nicholas School of the Environment, will provide testimony to the House Subcommittee on the Environment hearing entitled “Policy Relevant Climate Issues in Context.” Dr. Chameides recently served as the vice-chair of a report entitled “America’s Climate Choices” charged with thinking of the causes and consequences of climate change and the choices for responding and he will be presenting the key messages of this report to the Subcommittee.

The hearing will take place Thursday, April 25 at 10:00 a.m. in 2318 Rayburn House Office Building. The Subcommittee on the Environment is under the jurisdiction of the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Testimony will be posted on the Office of Federal Relation’s website when available.

READ MORE:
Extreme Weather: What’s Climate Change Got to Do With It? (blogs.nicholas.duke.edu)

 

OPINION: SANFORD PROFESSOR ON IMMIGRATION POLICY
Jacob Vigdor, a Sanford School of Public Policy professor, writes in an opinion piece in the Washington Examiner,

“Demographic and economic trends “signal that the days of fretting about the tide of illegal Mexican immigrants are, to a large extent, behind us. That tide has receded, and for demographic reasons it may not rise again.”

Recent shifts in migration “trends can help us to think about what our “new” immigration policy should look like. Border control will be of declining importance in a world where most migrants arrive in the United States from a different continent. Spanish will begin to recede as the nation’s de facto second language; Mandarin, Hindi and Tagalog will be among the most prominent replacements.”

READ MORE:
Manhattan Moment: Mexican immigration wave ended years ago (washingtonexaminer.com)

 

OPINION: MOSTLY QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT
David Schanzer, Associate Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at the Sanford School and the Director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security writes in an opinion piece that appeared in Foreign Policy magazine outlines the reasons that terrorist attacks inside the United States are exceedingly rare.

READ MORE:
Mostly Quiet on the Western Front (sanford.duke.edu)

 

SHOOTING THRUSTS SANFORD EXPERTS INTO GUN POLICY DEBATE
Columbine, Virginia Tech, Aurora, Tucson – these place names have become shorthand for the worst mass shootings in the United States. On Dec. 14, 2012, when 20 first-graders and six adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, Newtown, Conn., was added to that miserable list.

In the intense media coverage that followed, two Sanford professors, Philip Cook, ITT/Terry Sanford Professor of Public Policy and professor of economics, and Kristin Goss,associate professor of public policy and political science, became important voices in the renewed national debate over gun policy.

READ MORE:
Could This Time Be Different? School Shooting Thrusts Sanford Experts into National Gun Policy Debate(sanford.duke.edu)
Background: A Background Check even the NRA Could Love? (cnn.com)

 

FACULTY EXPERTS: WHAT MAKES FOR AN ETHICAL POLICY RESPONSE TO A CRISIS?
The latest entry in the Kenan Institute for Ethic’s “Good Question” series examines the ethical dilemmas policy makers face when attempting to respond to crisis situations. Co-authors Nicholas School of the Environment professor of environmental economics Lori Bennear, Department of History associate professor Ed Balleisen, and Duke Law School professors Jonathan Wiener and Kim Krawiec, discuss the “risk-risk trade-offs” of policy responses to crises such as the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident and the financial crisis of 2008.

READ MORE:
Regulation: Risk Regulation Involves Trade-offs. Crises can be Opportunities for Regulatory Learning and Improvement. (kenan.ethics.duke.edu)

 

FORMER AMBASSADOR DONNA J. HRINAK TO DELIVER BIDDLE LECTURE AT DUKE
Former U.S. Ambassador Donna J. Hrinak will speak about the cliches and realities of Latin America in the 21st century at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 23 at Duke University. The current president of Boeing Brazil, Hrinak previously served as U.S. ambassador to Brazil, Venezuela, Bolivia and the Dominican Republic, and as deputy assistant secretary of state for Mexico and the Caribbean.

Her lecture, “Latin America: More Than Just an Asterisk?” will explore what Latin American countries are doing to compete and contribute in a global world. The Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Lecture on International Studies is free and open to the public and takes place in room 04 at the Sanford School of Public Policy.

READ MORE:
Former Ambassador Donna J. Hrinak to Deliver Biddle Lecture at Duke (today.duke.edu)

 

SEN. MO COWAN (T ’91) HONORS LEGACY OF FIRST BLACK STUDENTS
As a part of the commemoration of 50 years of black undergraduate students at Duke University, U.S. Sen. William “Mo” Cowan delivered a keynote address that linked the legacy of Duke’s first black students and the impact of the Civil Rights Movement to the ongoing stubble to close the duration achievement gap for minority students.

Speaking before hundreds of alumni, students and Duke community members in Page Auditorium on April 13, Cowan, a 1991 graduate, offered a speech recognizing the “remarkable progress” the university and the nation has made over the last 50 years, but said “we shouldn’t feel like the work is complete.”

READ MORE:
Cowan Honors Legacy of First Black Students (today.duke.edu)
Video recording of the event (youtube.com)
Twit pic of Sen. Cowan with Duke alum and brother to President Richard Nixon, Ed Nixon (twitter.com)

 

FORMER GOV. BEV PERDUE TO JOIN SANFORD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY
Former North Carolina Governor Bev Perdue will be a distinguished visiting fellow at the Sanford School of Public Policy during the Fall 2013 semester. Perdue will also service in an advisory capacity with the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy.

From 2009 to 2012, Perdue was the state’s first female governor. She holds a Ph.D. in education and a master’s degree in community college administration, both from the University of Florida.

 

DUKE NAMES FIVE PROFESSORS BASS TEACHING FELLOWS
Five Duke professors with outstanding research and undergraduate teaching skills have been selected to join the ranks of the Bass Teaching Fellows.

“These professors represent the very best of what a master scholar-teacher should be,” said Steve Nowicki, dean and vice provost for undergraduate education. “From the very beginning, the goal of the Bass program was to encourage our best research practitioners to apply their intellect to enhance the educational experience of our undergraduate students.”

READ MORE:
Duke Names Five Professors Bass Teaching Fellows (today.duke.edu)