Duke Digest — April 30, 2015

In this issue:

  • Duke Grad Student Promotes Federal Investment in Research on Capitol Hill
  • Duke Joins @FLOTUS in #ReachHigher Campaign
  • Duke Students Named Goldwater, Truman Scholars
  • 18 Incredibly Impressive Students at Duke
  • Duke Study: Automatic Bill Payments May Be Driving Up Energy Use
  • Duke Prof Says Rating Nations on Fight Against Human Trafficking Speeds Along Legislation
  • Duke Study: Global Warming Not Reaching Worst-Case Scenarios
  • Dukies on the Move

DUKE GRAD STUDENT PROMOTES FEDERAL INVESTMENT IN ENGINEERING, PHYSICS RESEARCH ON CAPITOL HILL
First-year Masters of Engineering Management candidate, Victoria Nneji, was one of two Duke University students to attend the the CASE Workship – Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering.  The program, hosted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), aims to teach graduate students in STEM fields about the science and engineering policymaking that takes place across the federal government. Read a Q&A about her experience here.

DUKE JOINS @FLOTUS IN #REACHHIGHER CAMPAIGN
Using the hashtags #ReachHigher and #Duke2019, Duke University has been taking to Twitter to join in the First Lady’s campaign effort to encourage high school students to attain a degree of higher education. The social media campaign culminates on May 1, College Signing Day, and encourages alumni and high school seniors to post pictures of themselves in Duke gear to celebrate #Duke2019 and the experience of higher education.

Read More
Tweets featuring @DukeU and #ReachHigher.
Reach Higher: Complete your Education. Own your Future. (whitehouse.gov)

DUKE STUDENTS NAMED GOLDWATER, TRUMAN SCHOLARS
Juniors Lindsey Brown and Jay Ruckelshaus were named Goldwater and Truman Scholars, respectively. Brown, a math major studying patterns of neural activity as a binary code who won the Goldwater Scholarship, will receive support for graduate study in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. Ruckelshaus, a political science and philosophy double major, is one of 58  2015 Truman Scholars. On campus, he serves as a student representative on the Academic Affairs Committee for the Duke University Board of Trustees. He is also associate editor of Duke Political Review, senator of equity and outreach in Duke Student Government, and sole student representative on the Faculty Committee on Curriculum.

Read More:
Duke Junior Jay Ruckelshaus Named Truman Scholar (today.duke.edu)
Duke Junior Lindsey Brown Named Goldwater Scholar (today.duke.edu)

18 INCREDIBLY IMPRESSIVE STUDENTS AT DUKE
Business Insider profiles 18 Duke University undergraduates who, in their words, are “incredibly impressive.” These students are fighting against discrimination, sending time capsules into space, and finding a quicker way to detect cancer — in other words, going above and beyond and making Duke an exciting place to be.

Read More:
18 Incredibly Impressive students at Duke (businessinsider.com)

DUKE STUDY: AUTOMATIC BILL PAYMENTS MAY BE DRIVING UP ENERGY USE
According to a new study just out in The Review of Economics and Statistics, customers signed up for automatic bill payment programs use more energy, and accordingly pay more money on their bills, than those that aren’t. And this seems to occur, writes economist Steven Sexton, professor of public policy, because people pay less attention to what they’re paying each month — and thus, what they’re using.

“Automatic bill payment programs free customers from having to regularly review their bills in order to transmit timely payments,” Sexton explains. “And without that incentive, rational customers might stop looking at them, because attention itself is a scarce resource.”

Read more:
Automatic bill payments may be driving up your energy use — and your bills (washingtonpost.com)

DUKE PROF SAYS RATING NATIONS ON FIGHT AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING SPEEDS ALONG LEGISLATION
The U.S. State Department’s Trafficking in Persons (TIP) annual report has prompted countries to enact anti-human trafficking legislation at a faster pace than would otherwise be expected, according to research by Duke University professor of public policy Judith Kelley. Using funding from the National Science Foundation, Kelley analyzed diplomatic cables and surveyed NGOs to determine the impact of the annual ratings, which she claims is an unprecedented style of diplomacy.

Read More:
‘Scorecard Diplomacy:’ Rating Nations on the Fight Against Human Trafficking (sanford.duke.edu)

GLOBAL WARMING NOT REACHING WORST-CASE SCENARIO, DUKE-LED STUDY CLAIMS
A new Duke-led study based on 1,000 years of temperature records suggests global warming is not progressing as fast as it would under the most severe emissions scenarios outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

“Based on our analysis, a middle-of-the-road warming scenario is more likely, at least for now,” said Patrick T. Brown, a doctoral student in climatology at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment. “But this could change.”

Read More:
Global Warming More Moderate than Worst-Case Models (nicholas.duke.edu)

DUKIES ON THE MOVE
Brent McGoldrick (T ’97) named as Deep Root Analytics CEO. Most recently, McGoldrick served as Managing Director with FTI Consulting’s Strategic Communications practice in Washington, D.C. In 2012, he worked as Director of Advertising Analytics on the Romney-Ryan campaign.