Duke Digest — December 13, 2013

Duke Digest – December 13, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • RESEARCH: Lab Explores Potential Use of Copper in Fuel Cells
  • RESEARCH: Engineering Team Combines Technology to Improve Artificial Cartilage
  • CFO SURVEY: Affordable Care Act Could Curtail Hiring
  • OPINION: Sanford Prof Advocates Employment Corps in Debate over Living Wages
  • VIDEO: Sanford Prof on Difficulties of Governing, Foreign Diplomacy in Uncertain World
  • Brodhead Receives Academic Leadership Award
  • Duke Accepts 797 Early Decision Applicants

 

RESEARCH: LAB EXPLORES POTENTIAL USE OF COPPER IN FUEL CELLS
A team of Duke researchers, led by Ben Wiley, assistant professor of chemistry, may be finding a new way to convert solar energy into storable fuel — copper nanowires fused in a see-through film. While there are still engineering and chemistry challenges to making production and wide-spread use a reality, the nanowires have the potential to reduce production cost, time and inefficiency. Other applications for the federally-funded research project include flexible touch screens, organic LED lights and smart glass.

Read More:
Copper Promises Cheaper, Sturdier Fuel Cells (Duke Today)

 

RESEARCH: ENGINEERING TEAM COMBINES TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE ARTIFICIAL CARITILAGE
A federally-funded Duke research team has developed a better recipe for synthetic replacement cartilage in joints.

Combining two innovative technologies they each helped develop, lead authors Farshid Guilak, a professor of orthopedic surgery and biomedical engineering, and Xuanhe Zhao, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, found a way to create artificial replacement tissue that mimics both the strength and suppleness of native cartilage.

“From a mechanical standpoint, this technology remedies the issues that other types of synthetic cartilage have had,” says Zhao, founder of Duke’s Soft Active Materials (SAMs) Laboratory. “It’s a very promising candidate for artificial cartilage in the future.”

Read More:
Duke Engineers Make Strides Toward Artifical Cartilage (Duke Today)

 

CFO SURVEY: AFFORDABLE CARE ACT COULD CURTAIL HIRING
A significant percentage of U.S. chief financial officers indicate that because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), they may reduce employment growth at their firms and shift toward part-time workers.

A majority of finance chiefs also believe the full Social Security retirement age should be raised to help close the budget shortfall.

These are some of the findings from the latest Duke University/CFO Magazine Global Business Outlook Survey, which concluded Dec. 5.

Read More:
CFO Survey: Affordable Care Act Could Curtail Hiring (Fuqua)

 

OPINION: SANFORD PROF ADVOCATES EMPLOYMENT CORPS IN DEBATE OVER LOW WAGES
William Darity, Jr,  professor of public policy, African and African-American studies, and economics, wrote in a New York Times Room for Debate forum on improving living standards for low-wage earners:

“[A National Investment] employment corps could address a host of national human and physical infrastructure needs including the building and restoration of roads, highways, dams, museums, parks, the postal service, child care centers, health clinics and schools. It could serve as a pilot site for the implementation of innovative green technologies that would enhance our environmental health. And the jobs could offer decent pay and benefits.”

 

Read More:
Federal Law Requires Job Creation (NY Times)

 

VIDEO: SANFORD PROF ON DIFFICULTIES OF GOVERNING, FOREIGN DIPLOMACY IN UNCERTAIN WORLD
Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy, participated in a panel discussion on the forces of globalization, economic inequality and political conflict that is putting pressure on the boundaries and political structures of the Middle East , Europe, Africa and Asia. The event, hosted by the Woodrow Wilson Center, can be viewed here.

 

BRODHEAD RECEIVES ACADEMIC LEADERSHIP AWARD
Duke University President Richard H. Brodhead is among four recipients of the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s 2013 Academic Leadership Award. Each winner is an exceptional president of a U.S. college or university. In their announcement, the Carnegie Corporation said,

“Starting with his inaugural in 2004, President Brodhead has made the university’s primary mission “knowledge in service to society.”  His vision exemplifies the achievements that the Academic Leadership Award recognizes, including access and excellence, a commitment to the liberal arts, interdisciplinarity, and global engagement. “

Read More:
Brodhead Receives Academic Leadership Award (Duke Today)

 

DUKE ACCEPTS 797 EARLY DECISION APPLICANTS
After receiving a record 3,180 applicants before the Early Decision deadline, Duke University sent acceptances to 797 high school seniors Thursday evening, making them the first members of the Class of 2018.

Students admitted through Early Decision this year will represent almost 47 percent of next fall’s incoming class, which is expected to include 1,705 students. Of the 797 students offered admission, 643 will enroll in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and the remaining 154 will enroll in the Pratt School of Engineering.

North Carolina, New York, California, Florida, New Jersey and Virginia are the states with the greatest representation among students admitted through Early Decision.

Read More:
Duke Accepts 797 Early Decision Applicants (Duke Today)