Duke Digest — February 6, 2015

In Today’s Issue:

  • Rep. Scott Peters (D-CA, T ’80) Visits Campus
  • Duke Prof Argues Against Vaccine Choice in The Hill
  • Duke Prof on ‘Kidnap Economy’ of the Islamic State in
  • Duke Drone Expert on Proposed FAA Rules 
  • Duke-led, federally-funded Study Finds Inconsistencies in Climate Models
  • DukeDC Public Policy Alumni Group to Hold Inaugural Event Feb. 11
  • Sec. of Labor Perez to Deliver Sustainable Business Conference Keynote Feb. 11
  • Sen. Graham to Deliver Duke Law Conference Keynote Feb. 27
  • Dukies on the Move

REP. SCOTT PETERS (D-CA, T’ 80) VISITS CAMPUS
California Congressman and Duke alum Scott Peters visited Duke on Monday for a series of meetings with faculty, administrators, and students.  While on campus, Rep. Peters met with President Brodhead, Provost Sally Kornbluth, and Professor Drew Shindell.  Mr. Peters also spoke to an undergraduate class at the Sanford school taught by Professor Bill Adair.

Read More:
Twitter Pics with President Brodhead and Sanford Students

DUKE PROF ARGUES AGAINST VACCINE CHOICE ON THE HILL
David Siegel, associate professor of political science, uses public smoking laws as a case study to answer the question, “how would vaccine choice work?” in a piece appearing on the TheHill.com Contributors blog.

Read More:
How would vaccine choice work? (thehill.com)

DUKE PROF ON ‘KIDNAP ECONOMY’ OF THE ISLAMIC STATE
In a New York Times op-ed, David McAdams, professor of business administration and economics, outlines the “kidnap economy” of the Islamic State and argues that “there is a way to change this game, to turn the tables on terrorist kidnappers and undermine the kidnap economy. Law enforcement already offers a model for finding criminals whose illegal activities are so secretive that they cannot possibly be found by any amount of detective work — namely, business cartels.”

Read more:
The Right Way to Pay Ransom to Terrorists (nytimes.com)

DUKE DRONE EXPERT ON PROPOSED FAA RULES 
Mary “Missy” Cummings, associate professor of mechanical engineering and director of Duke’s Humans and Autonomy Laboratory, analyses the Federal Aviation Administration’s proposed rules for drones, saying “These new rules, if approved, will not only further stifle the emerging U.S. drone industry, which promises to infuse money and jobs into local communities, but will also allow other countries to overtake the U.S. lead quickly…The challenge drones pose is a very real one, and if we want to reduce the chances of public harm, the FAA and other bodies will need to step up. But they also need to be smart about it.”

Read More:
What to do about drones? (cnn.com)

DUKE-LED, FEDERALLY-FUNDED STUDY FINDS INCONSISTENCIES IN CLIMATE MODELS
A new Duke University-led study finds that climate models disagree as to why the average surface temperatures “wiggle” as Earth’s atmosphere warms. These models also struggled to explain why average global temperatures rose rapidly in the 1980s and 1990s, but have remained relatively stable since then.”This doesn’t mean greenhouse gases aren’t causing Earth’s atmosphere to warm up in the long run,” emphasized lead author Patrick T. Brown, a Ph.D. student in climatology at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. “It just means the road to a warmer world may be bumpier and less predictable, with more decade-to-decade temperature wiggles than expected. If you’re worried about climate change in 2100, don’t over-interpret short-term trends.” Partial funding was provided through a National Science Foundation grant.

Read More:
Study Analyzes Variability of Climate Models (enn.com)

DUKEDC PUBLIC POLICY ALUMNI GROUP TO HOLD INAUGURAL EVENT FEB 11
The DukeDC Public Policy Alumni Group, an affinity group of Sanford grads co-chaired by Amy Hepburn (T ’97, MPP ’01) and Kyle White (T ’07), will host Sanford School of Public Policy Professor and Associate Dean Frederick “FritzMayer for a conversation about the ways in which narrative motivates collective action, based on his new book, Narrative Politics Wednesday, February 11 from 6:00-7:30pm. The event will take place at the Duke in Washington Office.

SEC. OF LABOR PEREZ TO ADDRESS SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS CONFERENCE FEB. 11
The Secretary of Labor, Thomas Perez, will deliver the keynote address Wednesday, February 11, at the 10th Annual Duke University Sustainable Business & Social Impact (SBSI) conference. The conference, which is aimed at educating students and Triangle-area professionals on rapidly evolving opportunities to bring about positive and sustainable change through business, is the largest event of its kind in the Southeast and the largest student-led conference at The Fuqua School of Business. To learn more visit the conference homepage.

SEN. GRAHAM TO DELIVER DUKE LAW CONFERENCE KEYNOTE FEB. 27
The 2015 LENS Conference, Law in the Age of ‘Forever War’, will focus on the legal issues that accompany warfare in a time when technology, relationships between nations, and the abilities of non-state actors to affect the international stage, are all changing rapidly. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R- South Carolina) will deliver the Friday night keynote address at the Washington Duke Inn. Benjamin Wittes, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution will deliver the Saturday keystone speech, “NSA and the Future of Surveillance in the Age of Forever War.

Learn more and register for the conference here.

DUKIES ON THE MOVE
Abby Tinsley (T ’10)
has rejoined the office of Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) as a legislative assistant. She had previously served as a legislative assistant for Represent Rick Nolan (D-MN).

Eric Lindsey (T ’09) has joined the office of Congressman Randy Forbes (R-Va.) as his Defense Policy Advisor. Representative Forbes serves as the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces of the House Armed Services Committee.

Are you or other Dukies you know making a move in DC?  Please send tips to Landy Elliott –landy.elliott@duke.edu.