Duke Digest – January 11, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • DOD, Duke Partner in Research Projects
  • Duke Gun Control Expert Discusses Research in Live Webcast Friday
  • Duke Grads Create Startup to Track Fracking Fluids with New Technology
  • Duke Launches New Undergraduate Minor in Energy Engineering

 

DOD, DUKE PARTNER IN RESEARCH PROJECTS
The Defense Department sponsors Duke University researchers to conduct projects in mathematics, engineering and biology that advance military capabilities and strengthen national security, a university official said in a recent phone interview.

Duke University researchers actively participate in DOD programs and awards, and projects are designed to help the warfighter enhance intelligence gathering, avoid battlefield hazards and maintain medical readiness, said Dr. Jim Siedow, the university’s vice provost for research.

Read More:
DOD, Duke University Partner in Research Projects (defense.gov)


DUKE GUN CONTROL EXPERT DISCUSSES RESEARCH IN LIVE WEBCAST FRIDAY
Public policy professor Philip J. Cook has long studied the effectiveness of gun control efforts in this country and he will participate in a live “Office Hours” webcast interview on the topic at noon Friday, Jan. 11.

A recent article in the Raleigh News and Observer (below) describes the many media interviews Cook has done in the wake of the Newtown killings.

Watch live on the Duke YouTube channel or on this webpage. Viewers are welcome to send questions or comments for Cook on the Office Hours Facebook page via Twitter to @DukeOfficeHours.

Read More:

After Newtown, Many Turn to Duke Expert on Gun Violence (Newsobserver.com) 
Related: Why We Need to Talk About Guns (Dailybeast.com/newsweek)


DUKE GRADS CREATE STARTUP THAT TRACES FRACKING FLUIDS WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY
BaseTrace, a startup company created last year by a group of former Duke University graduate students, is developing chemical ID tags to trace fracking fluid that comes from specific wells.  The company uses inert DNA sequences that could make the fluids used in drilling every single gas well individually identifiable, potentially ending fights over the source of any subsequent contamination of water supplies in a drilling area.

Initial modeling indicated that a thimble-full of the tracer would be detectable under foreseeable conditions, even when mixed with millions of gallons of fluid.

The project won initial financial backing through the Duke Startup Challenge, a Duke University program incubating promising startups launched by students.

Read More:
Ideas to Watch in 2013: Traceable Gas Drilling Fluids (New York Times) 

DUKE LAUNCHES NEW UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN ENERGY ENGINEERING
Fracking. High gas prices. Global warming. Oil pipelines. Affordable, efficient home heating and cooling. Massive storm-related power outages. The world has many energy problems and few places to learn how to solve them.

Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering has stepped up to help close the knowledge gap by offering a minor in energy engineering. Pratt students may apply beginning with the spring 2013 semester.

Whereas energy concentrations at other universities are geared toward a single energy sector – a program in renewable energy or petroleum energy, for instance – Pratt’s minor is broadly based.

Read More:
Duke Launches New Undergraduate Minor in Energy Engineering (pratt.duke.edu)