Duke Digest — July 18, 2013

Duke Digest – July 18, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • Duke Congressional Briefing Series: July 23
  • Engineering Graduate Student to Join in White House Google Hangout
  • Vice-Provost for Research Participates in Roundtable Discussion
  • Law Professor Testifies on FCC Reform before House Commerce Subcommittee
  • RESEARCH: Uncovering Art without Damage
  • Federal Programs Lead to 451 Percent Increase in Military Veterans Enrolled at Duke
  • FACULTY OPINION: Schanzer Comments on Napotilano’s Legacy at DHS

DUKE CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING SERIES: JULY 23
Duke University is national leader among universities in Department of Homeland Security sponsored research with much of the current funding supporting projects that seek to improve airport and baggage screening protocols.  Please join us for a discussion of the latest breakthroughs that seeks to improve and streamline screening procedures, including revolutionary x-ray technology that goes beyond providing the outline of a bag’s contents to decipher its molecular structure and visual cognition performance in airport screening procedures.

Read More:
Announcing: Duke Congressional Briefing Series July 23 (governmentrelations.duke.edu)
RSVP to dukefederalrelations@duke.edu

 

ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENT TO JOIN IN WHITE HOUSE GOOGLE HANGOUT
Nathan Landy, a graduate student at the Pratt School of Engineering, will join a panel of scientists and engineers who are working to turn science fiction into science fact in a “We the Geeks” Hangout live on WhiteHouse.gov and on the White House Google+ page on Friday, July 19, at 12:00 pm EDT. Landy will be featured for his work on an invisibility cloak, research sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office.

Join in the conversation by using the hashtag #WeTheGeeks on Twitter and on Google+.

Read More:
Making a Better Invisibility Cloak (today.duke.edu)
We the Geeks: The Stuff Superheroes are Made Of (whitehouse.gov)

 

VICE-PROVOST FOR RESEARCH PARTICIPATES IN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
James Siedow, Duke Univeristy Vice-Provost for Research, participated in an annual roundtable sponsored by the Association of American Universities and the Science Coalition, an organization of 54 public and private research universities to discuss the impact of funding cuts imposed by the sequester on research. In an article on InsideHigherEd.com, Siedow said that some researchers might pass up on updating instrumentation to the latest technology, meaning the university could become less competitive. Overall, the group concluded that while they have seen some immediate impact on campuses, the full effects of sequester have yet to become apparent.
Read more:
Slow growing cancer” (Inside Higher Ed)

 

LAW PROFESSOR TESTIFIES ON FCC REFORM BEFORE HOUSE COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE
Stuart Benjamin, the Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law, addressed proposals to reform Federal Communications Commission procedures during his testimony on Capitol Hill on July 11. Benjamin, an expert in telecommunications law, administrative law, and the First Amendment, testified before the House Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology as it considers legislative reforms of FCC processes.  The hearing was chaired by Rep. Greg Walden.

Read More:
Benjamin Testifies on FCC Reform Before House Commerce Subcommittee (law.duke.edu)
Read written testimony (pdf)

 

RESEARCH: UNCOVERING ART WITHOUT DAMAGE
Professor Warren Warren, director of the Center for Molecular and Biomedical Imaging, found that a laser he developed to study melanoma can also uncover what’s underneath artwork without damaging the pieces. The laser, developed with the support of a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the laser’s benefits to cancer and art research, was be used by the N.C. Museum of Art in examining the 14th-century  painting “Crucifixion” by Puccio Capanna.

Read More:
Duke University discovers that laser can be used to examine art without causing damage (washingtonpost.com)

 

FEDERAL PROGRAMS LEAD TO 451 PERCENT INCREASE IN MILITARY VETERANS ENROLLED AT DUKE
At Duke, the number of undergraduate, graduate and professional students receiving VA education benefits has increased by 451 percent in the last four years — from 35 in 2009 to 158 today. The large majority (122) of those scheduled to be enrolled at Duke in the fall are veterans, while the remainder (36) are dependents of veterans. This increase comes as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down, which has led to a higher numbers of veterans who qualify for and take advantage of generous VA educational benefits to enroll in schools across the country. The VA’s Post-9/11 GI Bill covers the cost of tuition and fees at a public university.

Funds from the GI Bill can also be used toward a private education. Some private universities, including Duke, participate in the VA’s related Yellow Ribbon Program, through which the school and the VA share the cost difference between public and private universities.

Read More:
Duke’s Fastest Growing Student Group (today.duke.edu)

 

FACULTY OPINION: SCHANZER COMMENTS ON NAPOTILANO’S LEGACY AT DHS
David Schanzer, Associate Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at the Sanford School and the Director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, comments in the Christian Science Monitor:

“Secretary Napolitano has advanced the work of her predecessors and made DHS into a stronger, more focused and more effective agency,” he said. “Her greatest achievements, in my view, have been tougher enforcement of the southern border and targeting internal immigration enforcement on illegal immigrants who pose the greatest threat, and away from innocent young people who were brought here by their parents.”

Read More:
Janet Napotilano Steps Down at DHS: Who Will Replace Her? (csmonitor.com)