Duke Digest – June 17, 2013

 

  • Launch of New Federal Relations and Duke in Washington Websites
  • VA Secretary Eric Shinseki Meets with Brodhead During Campus Visit
  • RESEARCH: Study Finds Lack of Drinking Water Contamination from Fracking
  • OPINION: Law professor, Fmr. Army General on Military Make-Up
  • OPINION: Sanford professor on Challenges, Opportunities of US-China Talks
  • Graduate Students win NSF Contest in STEM Innovation
  • OPINION: Sanford Professors Weigh In on No Child Left Behind
  • Duke Law Center for Judicial Studies Receives $5 Million Grant from The Duke Endowment

  

LAUNCH OF NEW FEDERAL RELATIONS AND DUKE IN WASHINGTON WEBSITES
The Office of Federal Relations is pleased to announce the launch of updated Federal Relations and Duke in Washington websites. Featuring new layouts, new features, and expanded pages for Duke in Washington, these sites will provide a platform for the Office of Federal Relations and Duke in Washington team to continue carrying out our missions of representing Duke University’s interests in Washington, D.C.

Visit these sites to find updates on the goings on in Washington and Durham, faculty testimony and expertise, University-wide policies on political activity, and a new feature, the “Capitol Connections” blog. We hope you’ll visit soon and often!

Read More:
Duke Federal Relations (governmentrelations.duke.edu)
Duke in Washington (washingtondc.duke.edu)

 

VA SECRETARY ERIC SHINSEKI MEETS WITH BRODHEAD DURING CAMPUS VISIT
Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, G ’76, met with President Richard H. Brodhead on Tuesday to hear about student veteran issues at Duke.  It was Shinseki’s third visit to Duke since he became secretary.  He also met with other higher education leaders in the Triangle.

In the fall of 2013, Duke will enroll more than 150 students supported by educational programs funded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Read More:
VA Secretary Eric Shinseki Meets with Brodhead During Campus Visit  (today.duke.edu)

 

RESEARCH: STUDY FINDS LACK OF DRINKING WATER CONTIMINATION FROM FRACKING
A new study led by scientists at the Nicholas School of the Environment shows no evidence of groundwater contamination from shale gas production in Arkansas.

“The take-home message is that regardless of the location, systematic monitoring of geochemical and isotopic tracers is necessary for assessing possible groundwater contamination,” said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality.  “Our findings in Arkansas are important, but we are still only beginning to evaluate and understand the environmental risks of shale gas development.  Much more research is needed.”

Scientists at Duke collaborated with the United States Geological Survey to conduct the study, which was published in the peer-review journal Applied Geochemistry.

The study has been received coverage from publications such as Scientific American and the Washington Post.

Read More:
Study Finds No Evidence of Water Contanmination from Shale Gas Drilling in Arkansas (Nicholas.duke.edu)
Fracking Can Be Done Safely, But Will It Be? (scientificamerican.com)

 

OPINION: LAW PROFESSOR, FMR. ARMY GENERAL ON MILITARY MAKE-UP
Maj. Gen. Charles Dunlap, Jr. (Ret.), the Executive Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, in an editorial in the Raleigh News and Observer:

“At the recent congressional hearings on sexual assault in the armed forces, Sen. John McCain asserted that he could not give his “unqualified support” for a young woman’s wish to join the military.

By saying this, McCain sent a message that could potentially harm America’s security. The fact of the matter is we need more women in the ranks, not fewer.”

 Read More:
Despite McCain’s words, our military needs more, not fewer women (newsobserver.com)

 

OPINION: SANFORD PROFESSOR OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES OF US-CHINA TALKS
Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy and political science at the Sanford School of Public Policy, wrote an editorial for Deutsche Welle, offering analysis of the recent US-China talks and drawing upon his recent travels to China and Australia. In the editorial, he outlined three major dilemmas of the recent US “pivot” to Asia and four core objectives for the talk. He concludes:

“[The talks have] a challenging agenda – but a necessary one. While hardly the only factor shaping the 21st century world, US-China relations are one of the keys. The Obama-Xi summit is a huge opportunity to turn this key in the right direction.”

Read More:
US-China Talks: Huge Opportunity, Formidable Challenge (sanford.duke.edu)

 

GRADUATE STUDENTS WIN NSF CONTEST IN STEM INNOVATION
Two Duke graduate students have won funding through the Innovation in Graduate Education Challenge, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The Challenge asked graduate students to submit ideas with the potential to improve graduate education and professional development on a student, faculty, department, institution, professional societies or federal agency level.

Duke students took second and third place for projects designed to give graduate students tools to communicate their science research to the general public and learn grant writing, mentoring, lab budgets and service and outreach.

Read More:
Grad Students share Winning Ideas (duke.edu/dukeresearch)

 

OPINION: SANFORD PROFESSORS WEIGH IN ON NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND
Jacob Vigdor, professor of public policy and economics, and Helen Ladd, Edgar T. Thompson professor of public policy, have become important voices in the ongoing discussions and evaluations of “No Child Left Behind.” Ladd, who specializes in early childhood education and recently served as a co-chair of the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education, wrote an editorial for the Huffington Post praising the Obama Administration for its strong support of greater investments in early childhood education.

Jacob Vigdor, who specializes in educational achievement, recently released a study entitled “No Child Left Behind: Pass Or Fail?” which looked at the lessons – positive and negative – learned in the implementation of NCLB. Vigdor presented on the finding at a recent event at AEI in Washington and wrote an editorial that appeared in The Hill.

Read More:
An Easy Reach Across the Aisle On Education (sanford.duke.edu)
No Child Left Behind: Pass or Fail (sanford.duke.edu)
NCLB Sanctions: Tests taken, lessons learned (sanford.duke.edu)

 

DUKE LAW CENTER FOR JUDICIAL STUDIES RECIEVES $5 MILLION GRANT FROM THE DUKE ENDOWMENT
The Duke Endowment has committed $5 million to the Duke University School of Law to support the operations of its Center for Judicial Studies, established in late 2011 with the dual goals of enhancing judicial education and the quality of the judiciary, and improving the legal system and society’s understanding of judicial institutions.

The gift, which will fund an endowment to support the center’s operations, advances the Law School’s efforts to raise $85 million as part of the $3.25 billion Duke Forward fundraising campaign. The campaign supports priorities across Duke’s 10 schools, Duke Medicine and a range of university programs.

Read More:
Judicial Student Center receives $5 million grant from The Duke Endowment (law.duke.edu)