Duke Digest – March 29, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • Federally-Funded Research at Duke is Making the Military Safer, Healthier
  • Duke Launches USAID-Funded Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator
  • Duke, UVA Join Forces to Offer Creole, Tibetan Languages
  • ‘Redshirt’ Chemistry Scores Big
  • Jon Hunstman to Speak at Duke on Changing Political Landscape
  • Duke Accepts 2,987 Applicants for Class of 2017

 

FEDERALLY -FUNDED RESEARCH AT DUKE IS MAKING THE MILITARY SAFER, HEALTHIER
An article in the Fayettevile Observer this week highlighted some of the federally-funded, military-related research projects taking place at Duke. Among the Duke projects funded by the Department of Defense are research into improving detection of land mines and improvised explosive devices, the study of sea creatures to help with camouflage. and early detection of illness of troops.

Read More:
N.C. Universities Use Federal Funds for Military-Related Research (Fayobserver.com)
DOD-Funded Research at Duke (duke.edu/federalrelations)


DUKE LAUNCHES USAID-FUNDED SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP ACCELERATOR

On Friday, April 5, Duke University will launch the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke, the university’s new USAID-funded cross-Duke program. SEAD brings together interdisciplinary partners through a coordinated effort across Duke University and leverages institutional relationships and networks to create an integrated social entrepreneurship hub focused on global health.

SEAD will welcome on April 5 leading global health innovators from around the world for the first annual Duke Symposium on Scaling Innovations in Global Health. The symposium will offer opportunities to directly engage and network with leaders and innovators in global health, panel discussions, and an exposition of SEAD global healthcare innovators.

Full agenda, speaker information, and RSVP options can be found under “read more” below.

Read More:
About the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (DukeSEAD.org)
Agenda and RSVP Info (eventbrite)


DUKE, UVA JOIN FORCES TO OFFER CREOLE, TIBETAN LANGUAGES
Starting this fall, Duke students can take Tibetan classes taught at the University of Virginia, part of a new distance learning venture aimed at broadening the availability of low-visibility languages.

In exchange, Duke will offer its Creole language courses to students at UVA, a one-to-one swap with little cost to either university, officials say. Duke students will earn Duke credit for the UVA course and vice versa, said Laurie Patton, dean of Duke’s Trinity College of Arts & Sciences.

“We’re protecting languages that are very much a part of our global culture but aren’t necessarily the first you would take in a Western academic curriculum,” Patton said. “We aren’t replacing the face-to-face teaching of more commonly taught languages. We are protecting the languages that, in this economic climate, might not otherwise be sustained.”

Read More:
Duke, UVA Join Forces to Offer Creole, Tibetan Languages (duke.edu)

‘REDSHIRT’ CHEMISTRY STUDENTS SCORE BIG
Since 1950, the National Science Foundation has spent more than $22 billion on research to determine why students leave science and to fix the leaky pipeline to the science and medical professions. One issue, said Duke chemistry instructor Dorian Canelas, is the disparities in high school science and math education that students bring to college campuses.

To bridge that gap, Duke now offers an introductory chemistry class, Chemistry 99, which targets incoming undergraduates who are relatively inexperienced in science but have the ability to excel in the field.

Duke senior Eduardo Pascual was a “redshirt” in chemistry his first semester at Duke. He took the extra, introductory chemistry course, which he said gave him the skills and confidence to spend his first year after graduation in a research lab at a New York hospital and then apply to medical school.

Read More:
Redshirt Chemistry Students Score Big (duke.edu) 


JON HUNTSMAN TO SPEAK AT DUKE ON CHANGING POLITICAL LANDSCAPE
Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr., diplomat, businessman and twice-elected Republican governor of Utah, will deliver part two of his Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture series, on Thursday, April 11, at 5 p.m. at Duke University.

The talk, “Today’s Changing Political Landscape: Foreign and Domestic,” in Fleishman Commons at the Sanford School of Public Policy is free and open to the public.

In a dialogue with Sanford professor Philip Bennett, Huntsman will discuss U.S.-China relations in the context of the recent leadership transitions and incidents of intellectual property theft. He will also share his thoughts on how the Republican Party can adapt and seek to broaden its appeal.

Read More:
Gov. Hunstman to Speak at Duke on Changing Political Landscape (sanford.duke.edu)

DUKE ACCEPTS 2,987 APPLICANTS FOR CLASS OF 2017
The months of waiting are over for the 29,200 regular decision applicants who sought a place in Duke’s Class of 2017.

Wednesday afternoon, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions informed 2,897 applicants of their acceptance, making the regular decision acceptance rate 9.9 percent. This year was the most competitive admissions cycle to date, with several hundred more applications than last year, according to a Duke news release. Including early decision applicants, Duke received 31,785 applications.

Read More:
Duke Accepts 2,987 Applicants for Class of 2017 (DukeChronicle.com)