Duke Digest — March 3, 2014

In Today’s Issue:

  • Duke Faculty Testify in Congressional Hearings on Child Development, Presidential Authority
  • COMMENTARY: Introducing HASTAC, A Duke initiative using art to take STEM to STEAM
  • Rep. David Price Participates in “Rethinking Regulation” Panel Discussion
  • Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry to Speak at Duke March 6
  • Federally-Funded Research Demonstrates Benefits of Training New Scientists to Retrace Steps
  • Retaining Students Leads to Discipline Issues with Other Kids, Federally-Funded Study Shows
  • Nicholas Institute Report Outlines Regulatory Strategy to Accelerate Clean Energy Tech. under the CAA
  • Sally Kornbluth Named Duke University Provost
  • Dukies on the Move

DUKE FACULTY TESTIFY IN CONGRESSIONAL HEARINGS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT, PRESIDENTIAL AUTHORITY
Two Duke faculty members testified before Congressional committees on Wednesday in hearings highlighting Duke’s expertise over the wide scope of congressional oversight, interest and structure.  Chris Schroeder, Charles S. Murphy Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy Studies, testified before the House Judiciary Committee and Dr. E. Jane Costello, associate director for research at the Center for Child and Family Policy, testified before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

Read More:
Duke Faculty Testify in Congressional Hearings on Child Development, Presidential Authority (today.duke.edu)

COMMENTARY: INTRODUCING HASTAC A DUKE INITIATIVE USING ART TO TAKE STEM TO STEAM 
In a guest post on the Office of Federal Relations blog, Cathy Davidson, co-founder of HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Alliance Collaboratory), highlights a few Duke initiatives that are bridging the gap between the humanities and STEM education and thinking.

Read More:
Introducing HASTAC: From STEM to STEAM (governmentrelations.duke.edu)

REP. DAVID PRICE PARTICIPATES IN “RETHINKING REGULATION” PANEL DISCUSSION
Congressman David Price, Harvard Business School professor David Moss, and former North Carolina Commissioner of Banks Joseph Smith took part last Friday in a panel discussion:  “Preventing Regulatory Capture” as part of the program in Rethinking Regulation at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke.

Read More:
Rethinking Regulation panel brings together scholars and policymakers together to discuss “capture” (kenan.ethics.duke.edu)

FORMER U.S. AMBASSADOR TO AFGHANISTAN KARL EIKENBERRY TO SPEAK AT DUKE MARCH 6
Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry will speak on Thursday, March 6, at Duke University about his experiences in Afghanistan and the future of the country following the withdrawal of U.S. troops. Eikenberry, also a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, will discuss foreign policy challenges America will face over the next 20 years, what the United States has learned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, America’s response to the growth of China, U.S. civil-military relations and U.S. defense strategy.

Read More:
Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry to Speak at Duke (sanford.duke.edu)

FEDERALLY-FUNDED RESEARCH DEMONSTRATES BENEFITS OF TRAINING NEW SCIENTISTS TO RETRACE STEPS
In 2013, on the heels of several retraction scandals and studies showing reproducibility rates as low as 10 percent for peer-reviewed articles, the prominent scientific journal Nature dedicated a special issue to the concerns over irreproducibility. A team of math and statistics professors, including faculty from Duke University, has proposed a way to address one root of that problem by teaching reproducibility to aspiring scientists, using software that makes the concept feel logical rather than cumbersome. As the use and analysis of big data becomes increasingly sophisticated, the team writes, the ability of researchers to retrace steps and achieve the same statistical outcomes will only grow in significance.

Read More:
To Teach Scientific Reproducibility, Start Young (today.duke.edu)

RETAINING STUDENTS LEADS TO DISCIPLINE ISSUES IN OTHER KIDS, FEDERALLY-FUNDED STUDY SHOWS
When it comes to students repeating grades at school, public debate typically focuses on how retention affects an individual student’s academic performance, says Clara Muschkin, an associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. So she and her colleagues decided to take a wider view and consider how holding students back may affect the school as a whole.

“The decision to retain students has consequences for the whole school community,” said Muschkin. “That wider effect is an issue worth considering as we debate this policy.” The study was funded, in part, by grants from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, and suggests that since retention has school-wide ramifications, educators should do more to assist older and retained students with their academic struggles; for instance, through tutoring, summer school and peer mentoring.

Read More:
Retention Leads to Discipline Problems in Other Kids (today.duke.edu)

NICHOLAS INSTITUTE REPORT OUTLINES REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO ACCELERATE CLEAN ENERGY TECH. UNDER THE CAA
The Supreme Court hearD oral arguments Feb. 24 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and other stationary sources. A new Nicholas Institute report outlines regulatory strategies that could be implemented under the Clean Air Act to help states and sources accelerate the deployment of new and innovative clean energy technologies in conjunction with forthcoming EPA rules.

Read More:
Promoting Innovative and Clean Energy Technology Deployment in Conjunction with GHG Regulation of Stationary Sources under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act (nicholasinstitute.duke.edu)

SALLY KORNBLUTH NAMED DUKE UNIVERSITY PROVOST
Sally Kornbluth, a prominent cell biologist with long experience leading academic programs, has been named provost at Duke University, President Richard H. Brodhead announced Monday. Kornbluth is currently the James B. Duke Professor in the department of pharmacology and cancer biology at Duke and the vice dean for basic science in Duke’s School of Medicine.

Read More:
Sally Kornbluth Named Duke University Provost (today.duke.edu)

DUKIES ON THE MOVE
Several Duke alums have recent job changes — Keith Fontenot, MPP’82, former OMB Health Director, has joined Hooper, Lundy and Bookman as managing director of government relations and public policy; Deborah Oberman MPP‘92 is now vice president of public policy for the health insurance company Humana; and Rafe Mazer MIDP ’09 is now a financial sector specialist at the World Bank.

Have you or another Duke alum you know recently moved jobs? Please send new contact info to Alyssa Dack at alyssa.dack@duke.edu to continue receiving updates.