Duke Digest — November 1, 2013

Duke Digest — November 1, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • RESEARCH: Nurse Home Visits Lead to Dramatic Drop in Emergency Care
  • OPINION: What’s Wrong with the Children in Families First Act
  • OPINION: Policymakers Must Decided Public Works Priorities
  • OPINION: Fuqua Prof. Warns of Banking on Ed, Med Jobs to Boost Local Economies
  • Fmr. Congressman: Fighting Climate Change Doesn’t Mean Stifling Free Enterprise
  • Four Reps. To Visit Campus, Observe Federally-Funded Research Lab
  • North Carolina Delegation’s District, State Directors Visit Campus
  • Justice Thomas Discusses Path from South to Supreme Court Bench in Campus Visit
  • CIA Head, Journalist to Debate National Security, Free Press Nov. 11
  • Law Professor to Deliver Democracy in the World Lecture at Canadian Embassy

 

RESEARCH: NURSE HOME VISITS LEAD TO DRAMATIC DROP IN EMERGENCY CARE
A study of Durham Connects, a program that provides home visits for newborns and their parents in Durham, N.C. found that participating families visited the emergency room less often than control group families and had fewer overnight hospital stays.

The findings have significant cost implications because the price of hospital emergency room visits and overnight stays often ranges into the thousands of dollars. By contrast, the Durham Connects program costs an average of $700 per family.

The Affordable Care Act includes funding for home visiting programs. In September, the federal Department of Health and Human Services announced $69.7 million in grants to expand home visiting services in 13 states.

Read More:
Nurse Home Visits Lead to Dramatic Drop in Emergency (today.duke.edu)
New Developments in Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Pediatrics)

 

OPINION: WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE CHILDREN IN FAMILIES FIRST ACT
Kathryn Whetten, professor of public policy and global health and Director of the Center for Global Health Policy, led a research team that studied over 3,000 orphaned and abandoned children in five Asian and African countries and found as much abuse and neglect in family settings as in institutions.

Based on these results, she writes on nj.com regarding the Children in Families First Act, currently under consideration in Congress, “Instead of casting families as “good” and orphanages as “bad,” what’s needed is a multipronged approach to help more than 150 million orphans and tens of millions of street children around the world. Congress should focus on the part of the bill that is about enhancing families so they will be more likely to keep and adopt children.”

Read More:
What’s Wrong with the Children in Families First Act (nj.com)

 

OPINION: POLICYMAKERS MUST DECIDE PUBLIC WORKS PRIORITIES
Henry Petroski, professor of civil engineering and history, writes in The New York Times,

“It is not engineering that must change to keep up with the changing global climate, but how decisions are made based on cost- and risk-benefit analyses.

Engineers can perform those analyses — up to a point. What policy makers and politicians do with the results will make the difference. Analyses are not decisions, and so often it is a climate of another kind, the political climate in which deciders decide, that needs to change.”

Read More:
The Stormy Politics of Building (New York Times)

 

OPINION: FUQUA PROF. WARNS OF BANKING ON ED, MED JOBS TO BOOST LOCAL ECONOMIES
Aaron Chatterji, associate business professor at Fuqua School of Business and former senior economist at the White House Council of Economic Advisors, wrote in a New York Times editorial,

“while the number of education and health care jobs could indeed grow significantly in the coming years, that does not directly imply job growth in small and midsize cities that depend on these sectors.

In fact, the opposite situation could unfold for places that are not world leaders in providing education and health services.”

Read More:
The Bad News for Local Job Markets (New York Times)

 

FMR. CONGRESSMAN: FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE DOESN’T MEAN STIFLING FREE ENTERPRISE
Fmr. U.S. Rep Bob Inglis (R-SC) delivered the keynote address to the Duke University Energy Conference, in which he said Human-driven climate change is real — and so is the opportunity for government to combat it without hurting the energy industry or the economy.

“We’re not talking some altruism here, but rather a free enterprise fix that makes it so you fix the economy and the environmental problem fixes itself,”

The conference is designed to connect Duke University students and faculty with energy industry professionals, for increasing knowledge and understanding of energy-related issues within the Duke community and among businesses, government and other universities in the region.

Read More:
Inglis: Fighting Climate Change Doesn’t Mean Stifling Free Enterprise (today.duke.edu)

 

FOUR REPS. TO VISIT CAMPUS, OBSERVE FEDERALLY-FUNDED RESEARCH LAB
Rep. Richard Hudson (NC-R) chairman of the House Transportation Security Subcommittee, will visit Duke’s Fitzpatrick Center. He will be joined by Reps. George Holding (NC-R) and David Price (NC-D) and Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-D).

They will look at research being conducted to advance passenger screening technology. Duke ranks among the top universities in research grants from the Department of Homeland Security. The university’s research has focused on screening. The group will meet with President Richard Brodhead and then tour the lab.
Read more:
Four Congressmen headed to Duke to check out airport security research (News and Observer)

 

NORTH CAROLINA DELEGATION’S DISTRICT, STATE DIRECTORS VISIT CAMPUS
Duke OFR hosted a campus visit on Wednesday of last week for the state and district staff of the North Carolina delegation to Congress. These staffers oversee the home offices of the Senators and Representatives that represent North Carolina in the U.S. Congress, and they participated in a full day of meetings to learn more about Duke’s programs.  Topics included Duke Divinity School’s impact in the state, STEM education outreach programs and research, and lunch with student veterans. The staff then spent the afternoon with staff from the Duke University Health System Office of Government Relations.

Read More:
Event Recap: Congressional State and District Staff Day (governmentrelations.duke.edu)

 

JUSTICE THOMAS DISCUSSES PATH FROM SOUTH TO SUPREME COURT IN CAMPUS VISIT
Associate Justice Clarence Thomas invoked the memory of his grandfather multiple times as he told Duke Law students about his journey from the segregated South to the U.S. Supreme Court during a recent visit to Duke Law. –

Thomas discussed his childhood, early career, and nominations to the federal bench during a “Lives in the Law” interview conducted by Dean David Levi on Oct. 21.

Treating others the way he would like to be treated is an approach he takes even in crafting his judicial opinions, he said, in response to Levi’s observation that his opinions and dissents are always respectful in tone.

Read More:
Justice Clarence Thomas shares his journey from the South to the Supreme Court (law.duke.edu)

 

CIA HEAD, JOURNALIST TO DEBATE NATIONAL SECURITY AND PRESS FREEDOMS NOV. 11
Former director of the CIA and NSA Gen. Michael Hayden and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Barton Gellman will share a stage for the first time to discuss “Leakers or Whistleblowers? National Security Reporting in the Digital Age.”

The event will take place Monday, Nov. 11, at 6:00pm at the Sanford School of Public Policy. The event will be live-streamed online.

Read More:
CIA Head, Journalist to Debate National Security and Press Freedoms (sanford.duke.edu)

 

LAW PROFESSOR TO DELIVER DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD LECTURE AT CANADIAN EMBASSY
Donald L. Horowitz, professor of law and political science emeritus, will deliver the Seymour Martin Lipset Lecture on Democracy in the World at the Embassy of Canada on Thursday. Nov. 7. The talk, entitled “Ethnic Power-Sharing and Democracy: Three Big Problems,” is sponsored by the National Endowment for Democracy.

To learn more and RSVP, click here.