Duke Digest — October 18, 2013

Duke Digest — October 18, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • Duke Faculty to lead Federally-Funded Project to Study Ocean Circulation
  • Federally-Funded Research Provides Insight into Market Bubbles
  • COMMENTARY: Faculty Featured in Coverage of Debt Limit Debate
  • COMMENTARY: Sanford Professor on Impact of TPP Deal
  • Nicholas Director Says Supreme Court Review Won’t Affect Obama’s Climate Action Plan
  • Faculty Comments on Impact of Shutdown on Science, Research
  • ATHLETIC UPDATE: Countdown to Crazie, Football Travels to UVa 

DUKE FACULTY TO LEAD FEDERALLY-FUNDED PROJECT TO STUDY OCEAN CIRCULATION
Oceanographers from Duke University, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of Miami have received $16 million in grants from the National Science Foundation for the deployment of a new observing system in the subpolar region of the North Atlantic. The observing system will measure the ocean’s overturning circulation, a key component of the global climate system.
Susan Lozier, professor of physical oceanography at the Nicholas School of the Environment and the international project lead, says the project will address the impacts of glacier melt and rising temperatures on the oceans ability to store carbon, among other practical implications.
Read More:
Changes in Ocean Circulation Focus of $16 Million Project (Nicholas.duke.edu)
FEDERALLY-FUNDED RESEARCH PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO MARKET BUBBLES
Dan Gauthier, the Robert C. Richardson professor of physics, conducting experiments on a simple model of chaos has found that it may be possible not only to predict an extreme event, like a stock market collapse, but to intervene and prevent it from happening.
His research, supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, says that extreme events, termed “dragon kings,” are less random than chaos researchers had previously thought, and that if you know what to measure may even be able to be predicted and controlled.
Read More:
Market Bubbles May Be Predictable, Controllable (today.duke.edu)

 

COMMENTARY: FACULTY FEATURED IN COVERAGE OF DEBT LIMIT DEBATE
Faculty from across the university community were featured in news coverage of the debt ceiling negotiations taking place this week in Congress.

David McAdams, professor of economics, argued that applying game theory to politics could avert gridlock in the nation’s capitol in a New Times Op-Ed.  Law professors James Cox and Lawrence Baxter discussed how a U.S. debt default would have impacted the financial markets. Cox also authored an Op-ed warning Congress that negotiations were weakening the U.S. while enabling China.

Read More:
Changing the debt-ceiling game (nytimes.com)
Debt impasse shocks likely to be felt down the road (thedeal.com)
Duke’s Cox to Congress – you are weakening U.S., enabling China (bizjournals.com)

 

COMMENTARY: SANFORD PROFESSOR ON IMPACTS OF TPP DEAL
Corinne Krupp, associate professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy, spoke to WUNC, North Carolina Public Radio, on the necessity of trade agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership in a global economy.

“Most free trade deals are about reducing tariffs,” Krupp said. “But this trade agreement is going a lot further because tariffs are already pretty low.”

Instead, this agreement focuses on getting rid of red tape and bureaucracy to make trade between countries easier, Krupp said.. This includes equalizing intellectual property rights and allowing foreign countries to be more competitive in countries that prefer local firms.

Read More:
New Trade Deal Called NAFTA on Steriods (wunc.org)

 

NICHOLAS INSTITUTE DIRECTOR SAYS SUPREME COURT REVIEW WON’T AFFECT OBAMA’S CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Jonas Monast, the director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Duke University Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, said that the greenhouse-gas case before the Supreme Court is only focusing on a narrow point that won’t affect Obama’s push for new regulations on power plants.

Read More:
The Greenhouse-Gas Case Before the Supreme Court Won’t Matter for Tech (technologyreview.com)

 

FACULTY COMMENTS ON IMPACT OF SHUTDOWN ON SCIENCE, RESEARCH
Katherine King, visiting assistant of sociology, says in a Popular Mechanics article on the recent federal government shutdown’s impacts researchers personally as well as impacting public health,

“We also know that research we do early in our careers influences the trajectories our careers take,” she said. “I have been working at home during the shutdown, and look forward to being able to take the next steps in several projects once I can communicate with colleagues, access journals and data, and use equipment again.”

Read More:
What the Shutdown Did to Science (popularmechanics.org)

 

ATHLETIC UPDATE: COUNTDOWN TO CRAZIE, FOOTBALL TRAVELS TO UVA
The Duke men’s basketball team will celebrate the opening of the 2013-14 college basketball season this Friday, Oct. 18, at the annual Countdown to Craziness Presented by PNC in Cameron Indoor Stadium. Tune Starting at 9:00pm, ESPNU will televise Countdown to Craziness Presented by PNC as part of its four-hour ESPNU Midnight Madness telecast. Dino Gaudio and 2013 Duke Hall of Fame inductee Jason Williams will be on hand to call the action.

Tomorrow, the football team will travel to Charlottesville to take on the University of Virginia Cavaliers. Kick-off is set for 3:30pm, and will be streamed over ESPN3.

Jon Jackson, Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs, joined the Duke Politics and Policy Network for an athletic update during a lunch at the Duke in Washington Office this past Tuesday.

Read more about by visiting GoDuke.com.