Duke Digest — October 20, 2014

In Today’s Issue:

  • Duke Election Discussion Pt. 5: Economic Inequality and What’s Next
  • Duke Conference to Examine 20 Years of Free Trade Under NAFTA
  • Duke to Host Public Conversation on the Middle East Oct 27
  • Duke Prof. Says Adding Incentives Will Aid Development for Ebola Treatment
  • Duke Ph.D. Candidate on the “Leaky Pipeline’ for Female Scientists
  • Faculty Profile: Engineer Fills in Technology’s “Terahertz Gap”
  • Duke Alum Republican Pollster Profiled in NY Times

DUKE ELECTION DISCUSSION PT 5: ECONOMIC INEQUALITY AND WHAT’S NEXT
Weren’t able to join us for last week’s Duke election discussion series focused on economic inequality?  Read a recap of the conversation between Professor William (“Sandy”) A. Darity, Jr., Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of public policy, African and African American Studies and economics, and director of the Duke Consortium on Social Equality; and Dr. Valerie Rawlston Wilson, the director of the Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy at the Economic Policy Institute.

Join us this week for the next installment of the series, a conversation on the key races taking place in North Carolina featuring veteran political operatives at Duke and in DC.

Read More:
Education: A Complex but Universal Campaign Issue (governmentrelations.duke.edu)

DUKE CONFERENCE TO EXAMINE 20 YEARS OF FREE TRADE UNDER NAFTA
Duke University will bring a series of experts together Oct. 22 to examine the social, political and environmental effects of the 20-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The conference: “NAFTA@20: The Future of North American Competitiveness,” is free and open to the public. The conference will open with remarks from Roberta S. Jacobson, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs.  A full agenda is available here. The conference website is here.

DUKE TO HOST PUBLIC CONVERSATION ON CONFLICT IN MIDDLE EAST OCT 27
With a war raging in Syria that’s spilled over into Iraq, militant groups jockeying for attention and control, and a sobering post-Arab Spring reality that’s seen traditional alliances upended, political Islam scrutinized, and dissent stifled, four Duke experts put the latest developments and their relevance for America in perspective. What’s next for the Middle East? Join professors Bruce Jentleson (Sanford School of Public Policy), Abdeslam Maghraoui (Political Science), Omid Safi (Duke Islamic Studies Center), and David Schanzer (Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security) for a public conversation, October 27 at 5:30pm.

The event will also be live-streamed. Learn more here.

DUKE PROF SAYS ADDING INCENTIVES WILL AID DEVELOPMENT OF EBOLA TREATMENT
In a recent OpEd, David Ridley, faculty director of the Health Sector Management program at the Fuqua School of Business, writes about the potential for the priority review voucher (PRV) system to provide incentives for pharmaceutical companies to develop a cure for Ebola and other neglected diseases. He proposes several amendments to a 2007 law authorizing the PRV system and encourages Congress to include Ebola, among other diseases, to the program through the 21st Century Cures Initiative.

Read More:
Incentives would aid in developing Ebola treatments (News&Observer)

DUKE PH.D. CANDIDATE OUTLINES THE ‘LEAKY PIPELINE’ FOR FEMALE SCIENTISTS
Writing in the New Republic, Ph.D. candidate Rotem Ben-Shachar says, “Female scientists across the country are leaving prestigious paths. At each stage of the scientific ladderundergraduate to graduate to postdocmore women than men leave the academic sciences, a phenomenon that has been termed ‘the leaky pipeline.’ … The lack of self-confidence among female scientists ultimately stems from a conflict between the stereotypes associated with a woman’s role in society and a woman’s perception of herself as a scientist. Acknowledging this conflict is crucial; only once we take note of all the consequences of this conflict will we be able to repair the leaky pipeline.”

Read More:
Women Don’t Stick with the Sciences. Here’s Why. (New Republic)

FACULTY PROFILE: ENGINEER FILLS IN TECHNOLOGY’S  ‘TERAHERTZ GAP’
Metamaterials expert Willie Padilla joined the electrical and computer engineering department of Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering on July 1, 2014. Padilla focuses on developing techniques and devices that work in the terahertz range of the electromagnetic spectrum—the new frontier of the information age. He is working to create several applications of imaging devices using terahertz waves. One is a new way to detect skin cancer. A second application in the works uses terahertz waves to see through thick weather obstructions for so-called all-weather navigation, which could reduce the number of military deaths from helicopter crashes.

Read More:
Willie Padilla: Exploring Technology’s “Terahertz Gap” (pratt.duke.edu)

DUKE ALUM REPUBLICAN POLLSTER PROFILED IN NYT
Neil Newhouse (T ’74), a leading Republican pollster, credits his interest in survey research to classroom experiences at Duke in an October 17 New York Times piece profiling his current work on the midterm elections.  Newhouse will participate in the final installment of the Duke Election Discussion Series on November 13.

Read More:
Republican Pollster Takes Lessons Learned in 2012 to Senate Races (NewYorkTimes)