Duke Digest — September 13, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • USAID Administrator Calls for Innovation in Remarks at Sanford
  • Petreaus Talks National Security, Syria During Campus Visit
  • Lasker Honor for cochlear Implant Pioneer Wilson
  • Duke Law Clinic Receives $250,000 grant from U.S. DOJ
  • SURVEY: CFOs Weigh in on ACA, Interest Rates, Stock Market Overheating
  • RESEARCH: Climate Change may Speed up Forests’ Life Cycles
  • STUDY: Immigration Can Help Speed the Economic Recovery
  • COMMENTARY: Professors Weigh in on Obama’s Foreign Policy
  • ONLINE OFFICE HOURS: Duke Experts on Addressing Climate Change, Using the Clean Air Act

 

USAID ADMINISTRATION CALLS FOR INNOVATION IN REMARKS AT SANFORD
American leadership can still be effective through a model of development that uses US entrepreneurial energy to find sources of innovation that solve problems in emerging markets, USAID administrator Rajiv Shah told a Duke audience Thursday.

Shah cited the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke, which supports new health care practices in developing countries and engages Duke students, faculty and medical practitioners in solving problems in cooperation with partners in those countries.

Read More:
USAID Administrator Call for Innovation to Promote Development in Emerging Countries (today.duke.edu)
Video of Shah’s Remarks (youtube.com)

 

PETRAEUS TALKS NATIONAL SECURITY, SYRIA DURING CAMPUS VISIT
Former CIA Director Ret. Gen. David Petraeus discussed the Syrian war as well as democracy in the Middle East and the balancing of security and civil liberties during a talk at Duke on the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The former commander of coalition forces in Iraq and Afghanistan appeared in conversation with Peter Feaver, professor of political science and public policy, and said the United States must respond to evidence of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons in the conflict. While approving of this week’s diplomatic initiative, Petraeus cautioned that implementing the proposal will be challenging.

Read more:
Petraeus takes a Duke Audience on a Global Tour of National Security (today.duke.edu)

 

LASKER HONOR FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANT PIONEER WILSON
Blake S. Wilson, a pioneer in the development of cochlear implants who serves as a co-director of the Duke Hearing Center, will receive the 2013 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.  The Lasker Awards are among the most respected science prizes in the world. Eighty-three Lasker laureates have received the Nobel Prize, including 31 in the past two decades. Wilson is an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering and received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Pratt School of Engineering in 2007.

Read More:
Lasker Honor for Cochlear Implant Pioneer Wilson (today.duke.edu)

 

DUKE LAW CLINIC RECEIVES $250,000 GRANT FROM U.S. DOJ
Duke Law School’s Innocence Program, which includes the Wrongful Convictions Clinic and Innocence Project®, has been awarded a $249,718 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Students and faculty in the Wrongful Convictions Clinic and the volunteer Innocence Project investigate and litigate North Carolina inmates’ credible claims of innocence.  The grant, from the DOJ’s Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Assistance, will help fund summer internships in the Wrongful Convictions Clinic for Duke Law students in order to ensure year-round progress is made on cases, as well as costs for investigation, expert and forensic analysis, travel, and litigation support and training relating to clients’ claims.

Read More:
Wrongful Convictions Clinic and Innocence Project receive $250,000 grant from DOJ (law.duke.edu)

 

SURVEY: CFOs WEIGH IN ON ACA, INTEREST RATES, STOCK MARKET OVERHEATING
In a survey of 530 U.S. CFOs, full-time domestic employment is expected to rise nearly two percent in the U.S., which would reduce the unemployment rate to less than seven percent within a year. This increase comes in spite of some reluctance to hire full-time employees due to economic uncertainty and implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

This is one of the findings in the latest Duke University/CFO Maganzine Global Business Outlook Survey.

 Read More:
CFOs Weigh in on ACA, Interest Rates, Stock Market Overheating (Fuqua.duke.edu)

 

RESEARCH: CLIMATE CHANGE MAY SPEED UP FORESTS’ LIFE CYCLES
Many climate studies have predicted that tree species will respond to global warming by migrating via seed dispersal to cooler climates. But a new federally-funded study of 65 different species in 31 eastern states finds evidence of a different, unexpected response. Nearly 80 percent of the species aren’t yet shifting their geographic distributions to higher latitudes. Instead, they’re staying in place — but speeding up their life cycles.

James Clark, professor of environment, led the study and says that anticipating the impacts of this unexpected change on U.S. forests is an important issue for forest managers and for the nation as a whole. It will have far-reaching consequences for biodiversity and carbon storage.

Read More:
Dual Impacts of Climate Change: forest migration and turnover through life history (onlinelibrary.wiley.com)

 

STUDY: IMMIGRATION CAN HELP SPEED UP ECONOMIC RECOVERY
In a study prepared for Americas Society/Council of the Americas and the Partnership for a New American Economy, Jacob Vigdor, professor of public policy and economics, assessed the economic impact of immitration on more than 3,000 U.S. counties between 1970 and 2010.

Foreign-born residents, who now account for one in eight Americans, are boosting job growth, raising home prices and more broadly helping to revive thousands of economically distressed communities, the report found.

Read More:
Can Immigration Speed the Economic Recovery? (cbsnews.com)

 

COMMENTARY: PROFESSORS WEIGH IN ON OBAMA’S FOREIGN POLICY
Bill Chafe, professor of history, wrote an op-ed in the News & Observer on President Obama’s three primary convictions in foreign policy “that, at times, run contrary to one another.”

Peter Feaver, professor of political science and public policy, appeared in the New York Times in a piece regarding Obama’s pivots in reacting to the Syrian confrontation.

Read More:
Obama’s foreign policy performance: Balancing convictions (newsobserver.com)
A Rare Public View of Obama’s Pivots on Policy in Syria Confrontation (nytimes.com)

 

ONLINE OFFICE HOURS: DUKE EXPERTS ON ADDRESSING CLIMATE CHANGE, USING THE CLEAN AIR ACT
In a live webcast conversation at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, three Duke scholars will preview the legal, political, environmental and economic implications of the Administration’s proposed use of the Clean Air Act to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Watch the “Office Hours” conversation live on Duke’s YouTube channel.