The Duke Digest – May 2, 2013

In Today’s Issue:

  • Duke Faculty Testify, Offer Expertise at Hearing, Briefing
  • Registration Open for D.C. Institute on Law and Policy
  • Research: Political Ideology and Energy-Efficient Products
  • Research: X-ray Scatter Technology
  • Generating Electricity from Hog Waste
  • Research: Pratt Professor Finds Cicadas Get a Jump on Cleaning
  • Former Managing Editor of Washington Post to Lead Duke Journalism Center
  • Opinion: Sanford Professor on Boston Marathon Aftermath
  • David Rubenstein Commits $10 Million to Sanford School
  • Conference to Discuss the Role of Happiness in Shaping Public Policy 

 

DUKE FACULTY TESTIFY, OFFER EXPERTISE AT HEARING, BRIEFING
Two members of the Duke faculty appeared on Capitol Hill last week, offering expert perspectives on climate change and disaster response. Dr. Bill Chameides, Dean of the Nicholas School of the Environment, testified before the Subcommittee on the Environment during a hearing entitled “Policy-Relevant Climate Issues in Context.” Dr. Chameides appeared through his role as the vice-chair of the report America’s Climate Choices.

Dr. Elizabeth Frankenberg, Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, participated in a panel discussing Social Science Research on Disasters: Communication, Resilience, and Consequences. During the briefing, Dr. Frankenberg presented findings from her research on the 2004 tsunami. The briefing, sponsored by the Coalition for National Science Funding, was coordinated to highlight research supported by the National Science Foundation.

Read more:
Dr. Chameides testimony (duke.edu/federalrelations)
Dr. Chameides’ blogs about testifying (nicholas.duke.edu)
Mission statement of the Coalition for National Science Funding
Dr. Frankenberg presents (Duke Federal Relations)

 

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR D.C. INSTITUE ON LAW AND POLICY
Duke Law will offer a new D.C. Summer Institute featuring short courses taught by Duke Law faculty at the Duke in Washington facilities. The 10-day sessions will provide overviews of the relevant constitutional and regulatory law, the legislative process, and the legal framework in which public policy is formulated and implemented in specific areas, such as national security, financial institutions, environmental law, and health care. The curriculum and structure of the Institute is designed for professionals working in law and/or public policy, those considering law school or careers in the public sector, and others seeking to learn more about the legal context in which policy is developed.

Register here: D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy (law.duke.edu)

 

RESEARCH: FUQUA PROFESSOR ON POLITICAL IDEOLOGY AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS
Rick Larrick, Professor of Leadership and Management at the Fuqua School of Business, has co-authored new research finding that marketing strategies emphasizing a product’s environmental benefit may actually discourage politically conservative shoppers from buying their products. The paper, “Political Ideology Affects Energy-Efficient Attitudes and Choices,” suggests companies use financial incentives or emphasize energy independence as better ways to get people to buy energy-efficient products because these attributes cross political boundaries.

Read More:

Environmental Labels May Discourage Conservatives from Buying Energy-Efficient Products (Fuqua.duke.edu)

 

RESEARCH: PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS TO DEVELOP X-RAY SCATTER TECHNOLOGY
David Brady, head of the Duke Imaging and Spectroscopy Program, and other Duke researchers are working closely with officials at the Department of Homeland Security and private industry to develop the “X-ray scatter,” a technology that would allow security officers at airports to identify the solids and liquids in your suitcases without a hands-on search. The Duke team is working in response to the DHS  Science and Technology Directorate issuing a submissions call for grant funding for improving explosive detections systems to more quickly and accurately identify improvised explosive devices for checked baggage at airports.

Read More:

No Molecule Left Unchecked (scienceline.org)
Professor David J. Brady Website (Duke.edu)

 

GENERATING ELECTRICITY FROM HOG WASTE
Researchers at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and the Duke carbon Offsets Initiative have released the results of a study showing that capturing methane gas from hog farms and piping it into existing natural gas pipelines may be a cost-effective way to meet North Carolina’s Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (REPS).

Funded by Duke Energy Carolinas and the Environmental Defense Fund, researchers say the study provides a first step toward an informed strategy to increase swine gas energy in the state. In the study, researchers present the most cost-effective way to collect and deliver swine gas and evaluate the cost savings, income potential and possibility for reducing greenhouse emissions.

Read More:
Study Evaluates Strategies for Generating Electricity From Hog Waste (today.duke.edu)

 

RESEARCH: PRATT PROFESSOR FIND CICADA’S SELF-CLEANING WINGS MAY HAVE REAL WORLD IMPLICATIONS
Chuan-Hua Chen, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at the Pratt School of Engineering, has released results of federally-funded research explaining how cicadas keep their wings clean. The research shows that dew drops can be beneficial not only in cleaning cicada wings, but other water-repellant surfaces. On these so-called superhydrophobic surfaces, dew drops “jump” by themselves, carrying away the contaminants.

“These findings point to an alternative route to achieve self-cleaning which is fundamentally different from the conventional wisdom involving rolling or colliding droplets on a superhydrophobic surface,” Chen said. “Self-cleaning surfaces using the jumping-drop mechanism can work at any orientation, which is a huge advantage for applications with unfavorable orientations with respect to gravity, such as mobile electronics and building roofs.”

Chen’s research is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

Read More:
Cicadas Get a Jump on Cleaning (pratt.duke.edu)

 

FORMER MANAGING EDITOR OF WASHINGTON POST TO LEAD DUKE JOURNALISM CENTER
Philip Bennett, the Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy, has been named director of the DeWitt Center for Media and Democracy. His two-year appointment will begin July 1.

Bennett joined Duke’s faculty in 2009 after serving four years as the managing editor of The Washington Post, during which he helped lead the newspaper to 10 Pulitizer Prizes. Bennett has also been serving as the managing editor of the PBS documentary program “FRONTLINE,” a post he will step down from in May.

Read More:
Bennett to Lead DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy (sanford.duke.edu)

 

OPINION: SANFORD PROFESSOR ON BOSTON MARATHON AFTERMATH
David Schanzer, Associate Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at the Sanford School and the Director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, has been a prominent voice in the conversation following the Boston Marathon bombings, including the capture of the Tsarneav brothers and the lessons the nation can learn from this incident.

In his most recent commentary, Schanzer discusses the constraints and complications that kept the government from thwarting the Tsarneav’s brother’s plot. In part, he writes,

“the hard reality is that data-driven counterterrorism is tough business. We have a huge, complicated country. People are constantly moving and changing. Behaviors that appear obviously suspicious today may have seemed innocuous a year or two ago — even to the seasoned counterterrorism investigator. The bureaucracies dedicated to protecting us do not have unlimited resources and they are difficult to coordinate. And we properly place limits on governmental institutions so they lack the power to investigate and conduct surveillance based on thoughts and ideas rather than conduct.”

Read More:
Beware of Easy Answers to the ‘Who Dropped the Ball?’ Question (sanford.duke.edu)
Boston Bombing Suspects Raise New Terrorism Questions (National Geographic Daily News)
Interrogate Boston Bomber for Intelligence and Then Prosecute Him (The Huffington Post)
David Schanzer Joins Panel Discussion of the Boston Bombing (China Radio International)

 

DAVID RUBENSTEIN COMMITS $10 MILLION TO SANFORD SCHOOL
Duke University trustee David M. Rubenstein is giving $10 million to the Sanford School of Public Policy to endow graduate fellowships and undergraduate internships, and to create a fund that will enhance the school’s engagement with the policy world, President Richard H. Brodhead announced Tuesday.

Of the gift, $2 million will create the David M. Rubenstein Dean’s Engagement and Impact Fund, which can be directed by the dean toward projects that will increase the impact and visibility of the work done by Sanford faculty and students.

Kelly Brownell, currently the James Rowland Angell Professor of Psychology at Yale University, will become Sanford’s next dean on July 1. His priorities for the fund will include enhancing the Duke in D.C. program and building programming that can help make the school’s resources and expertise more directly available to legislators and other policymakers.

Read More: David Rubenstein Commits $10 Million to Sanford School (today.duke.edu)

 

CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS THE ROLE OF HAPPINESS IN SHAPING PUBLIC POLICY
On May 22-23, the Duke Center for Law, Economics, and Public Policy will host an interdisciplinary conference on the role of happiness in shaping public policy. Featuring leading scholars from a variety of disciplines, including economics, philosophy, psychology, and law, presenters will highlight current research about the normative relevance of happiness and its role in shaping public policy. The conference is co-sponsored by the Kenan Institute of Ethics “Rethinking Regulation” program.

Click here to register